Cognitive Behavioral Psychologists of New Jersey
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We also treat relationship break-ups, anger, post-traumatic stress disorder, loss and grief, and many other problems.

Dr. Lynn R. Mollick and Dr. Milton C. Spett - founders of leaders of the New Jersey Associaton of Cognitive Behavior Therapists

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

What is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

Can OCD be Cured?

Many people say that OCD is a chronic illness that can be controlled and lived with, but cannot be cured. We believe this is because most practitioners treat OCD with only exposure. We have treated many patients who did not improve with exposure but have overcome their OCD when we switched to Cognitive Therapy or Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. If you suffer from OCD, we will find the therapy or the combination of therapies that works for you. By the end of treatment, most of our patients have become symptom-free.

Obsessions
Obsessions are unwanted, distressing thoughts that keep popping into your head. These thoughts are often frightening, embarrassing, sexual, aggressive, sinful or forbidden. They usually create anxiety or other bad feelings. Obsessions often begin with the words "What if...?" For example, "What if I am gay?" People with OCD try to get rid of these upsetting thoughts, but the more you try to get rid of them, the more intensely they return.

Compulsions
Compulsions are the things you do to get rid of the bad feelings caused by the obsession. Compulsions often involve checking, washing, praying, doing things "the right way," or making things "just so."

Performing compulsions makes you feel better for a little while, but the anxiety and the urge to perform the compulsions return with a vengeance.

Characteristics of OCD
OCD symptoms tend to increase under stress. People with OCD usually know that their obsessions and compulsions are excessive or unreasonable, but they want to be absolutely certain that they are safe and everything will be fine.

Types of OCD

Contamination OCD

Obsession – "What if I touched something contaminated?"
Compulsion – Repetitive hand washing, avoiding touching things.

Medical OCD

Obsession – "What if I have AIDS?" "What if I have a fatal illness?"
Compulsion – Excessive medical visits and tests, and frequent asking for reassurance.

Checking OCD

Obsession – "What if I forgot to lock the door, and my house is burglarized?" "What if I forgot to turn off an appliance and the house burns down?"
Compulsion – Repeatedly checking the door or the appliances.

Harm OCD

Obsession – "What if I hurt my child?"
Compulsion – Repetitive checking to make sure the child is okay.

Hit and Run OCD

Obsession – "What if I hit a pedestrian with my car?"
Compulsion – Repeated checking in the rear-view mirror; getting out of the car and searching the area for an injured pedestrian; driving back multiple times to be sure you didn't hit someone.

Scrupulosity OCD

Obsession – "What if I committed a sin?"
Compulsion – Repetitive prayer.

"Making Things Right" OCD

Doing things a specific number of times, for example: washing each body part five times, or doing everything on one side that you have done on the other side.

Treatment for OCD

Cognitive Behavior Therapy
Exposure and Response Prevention is the most researched form of CBT for OCD.

Several studies have found that a form of CBT called Cognitive Therapy is just as effective as Exposure and Response Prevention for OCD.

Another form of CBT called Acceptance and Commitment Therapy also shows promise for OCD.

We will discuss with you which form of Cognitive Behavior Therapy would be best for you, or we'll combine strategies from all forms of CBT to meet your unique needs.

Medication
Medication can be helpful for OCD, but research has found that Cognitive Behavior Therapy is twice as effective. If you come to our practice taking medication, we'll work with your prescribing doctor to adjust your medication or, if you wish, to get off medication.

We treat adults, adolescents, and children with OCD.

Call us at 908-276-3888

Cognitive Behavioral Psychologists of New Jersey
1150 Raritan RoadCranford, New Jersey
Opposite Friendly's RestaurantOne mile from GSP exits 135 and 136